Archive for the Violence Category

School Bullying Resources

Posted in Violence on August 21, 2008 by cheappaper

In another life, I have a list of resources related to school bullying.  Figured I toss them out here in the event they are of assistance.

Let me know if any links end up broken.  If you have a good suggestion, let me know and I’ll add it to the list.

Anti-Bullying Network. The Network was set up by the Scottish Executive at the University of Edinburgh so that teachers, parents, and young people can share ideas about how bullying should be tackled. http://www.antibullying.net/
ADL Good resource with a number of articles on cyber-bullying. http://www.adl.org/education/cyberbullying/
Back off Bully. http://www.backoffbully.com/
Bullying in Schools. An Educational Resource Information Center (ERIC) Has an excellent collection of journals and links related to bullying. http://www.eric.ed.gov/
Bullying Information for Parents and Teachers. Includes causes and consequences of bullying, classroom suggestions, advice for parents, gender differences in bullying, current bullying research. http://www.lfcc.on.ca/bully.htm
Bullying.org. A Canadian site with an international following that allows victims of bullying to share their stories and know that they are not alone. http://www.bullying.org/splash_page/bullying.cfm?sRes=768
Center for the Study and Prevention of Violence. The Center for the Study and Prevention of Violence was founded in 1992 to provide informed assistance to groups committed to understanding and preventing violence, particularly adolescent violence. Since that time, its mission has expanded to encompass violence across the life course. Their homepage can be found at http://www.colorado.edu/cspv/index.html and information on bullying can be found at http://www.colorado.edu/cspv/safeschools/bullying/overview.html
Child Abuse Prevention Services: Child Abuse Prevention Services (CAPS) is a not for profit, volunteer organization founded in 1982 to respond to the growing problem of child abuse and neglect on Long Island, New York. In 1995 CAPS created the Child Safety Institute, providing innovative and comprehensive child safety and child prevention programs and materials. http://www.capsli.org/
Connecticut State Department of Education. The SDE has a page in its “Parent and Community” section, covering School Climate, Bullying, and Character Eduction. It include bullying resources, including recent legislation, summaries of key information, and links to bullying resources. It may be accessable here. If that link does not work, go to the SDE homepage here and click down through the menus.
Maine Project Against Bullying. The website is intended to keep the reader informed of Maine’s efforts to impact the issue of bullying in its schools and to provide links to other resources relevant to bullying. http://lincoln.midcoast.com/~wps/against/bullying.html
National Youth Violence Prevention Resource Center. This is a federal resource for communities working to prevent violence committed by and against young people. It has a page on bullying numerous links to a wide variety of resources. http://www.safeyouth.org/scripts/index.asp
Stop Bullying Now. A site of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Contains a variety of resources, including animated podcasts. http://www.stopbullyingnow.hrsa.gov/index.asp
The Bully Project. Information on prevention, intervention, and support for victims of bullying in schools. http://www.stopbullyingnow.com/
The National Campaign Against Youth Violence. The National Campaign Against Youth Violence (NCAYV) is a nationwide public awareness campaign that works to reduce youth violence by and against youth. Created by America’s top business, academic, community and youth experts, NCAYV’s mission is to create a safer America for all youth to live, learn and grow. www.noviolence.net

Just another casaulty

Posted in Tolerance, Violence on July 24, 2008 by cheappaper

I can add nothing of value so I provide just the link.  [Via]

Seven Dirty Words

Posted in Tolerance, Violence on June 24, 2008 by cheappaper

George Carlin was one of my favorite comedians. His death got me pondering again his famous (or infamous) Seven Dirty Words. It has always struck me that his seven dirty words all relate to having sex or sitting on the toilet.

As he used to say, all the other words were acceptable for television, right?.

These words include kill, murder, slay, execute, assassinate, terminate, massacre, eradicate, cleanse, call in, dispatch, zap, polish off, ice, kavork, pop, smoke, blow away, do in, take out, postal, swat, bogart, extinguish, annihilate, slaughter, do up, hit, whack, scratch, waste, off, snuff, liquidate, butcher, lynch, dry-gulch, burke, and gank.

Lest we forget, Holocaust, Killing Fields, and Darfur are acceptable too.

I will leave it to the philosophers whether, in a world of scant resources, it is better to kill than to give life.

As I’ve said before, though, the kids will always figure it out. My hunch is that if we showed them more tits and dicks, and less whacks and hits, we might live in a different place.

Rest in peace George. You will be missed.

Sex, Guns, TV, and Classrooms

Posted in The Middle Ground, Violence on May 1, 2008 by cheappaper

Tara Parker-Pope writes too quick a byte on sexual harassment in our schools. One of the comments states,

What boy HASN’T played “Tune in, Tokyo” with the girls in school? Sex is a beautiful, natural act and should be encouraged, not confined into a dark, shameful corner. Let’s work to produce an enlightened, healthy Generation Y.

Tara fires back,

FROM TPP — But the discussion here isn’t about sex. It’s about harassment. And “tune in tokyo” is about grabbing a girls breasts without permission and turning them like they are radio dials. The fact that you think this is just harmless boy behavior is really disgusting.

I think Tara and her commenter both miss the mark. Sex, harassment, violence, and bullying are interrelated in complex ways that we may never fully understand.

I rarely watch TV. Each time I do, however, I see two things in almost all shows: violence and sex. The violence is explicit, graphic, and acceptable. It is most effective when used by the good guys. The sex is usually implicit, seductive, and subliminal. When it is shown graphically, it is usually lustful not loveful.

What a recipe. Take kids aged 12-18, add hormones, and stir a toxic mix of acceptable violence and unacceptable sex. The result cannot be anything but harassment and bullying.

I think Tara’s commenter, for all his misunderstanding, may have stumbled on a better solution than Tara’s violent name calling. I suspect if sex was acceptable and violence was not, the results in our classrooms might be different.

We’re out of Ammo and the Battle’s Just Getting Warm

Posted in The Middle Ground, Violence on April 4, 2008 by cheappaper

The New York Times today reports that Al Qaeda’s latest HIPO is a brash leader named, Abu Yahya al-Libi.  A focus of the article was on a video released by Abu Yahya on  September 10, 2007.  In the video, Abu Yahya offers six strategies the U.S. and others might take in their fight for the hearts and minds of the Muslim world.

Quoted in the article is Jarret Brachman, who has explained Abu Yahya’s strategy behind the video.  Dr. Brachman calls the ploy brilliant.  I agree.  He believes the action helps inoculate Jihadists from propaganda produced by countries seeking to discredit Al Qaeda.  I agree again.  Noticably absent from the discussion, however, is the issue of credibility.

In an information war, credibility is the ammunition that wins battles.  As Dan Rather knows, an error of information, a loss of credibility, and the battle is lost.  In this era, an error of information is not long hidden.

Credibility is gained a yard at a time.  It can be lost in an instant.  An error need not be intentional.  Dan Rather did not intend to lie.  He simply screwed up.  The result, in the language of labor relations, was his industrial death.

I think Abu Yahya’s stategy is more than brilliant.  He taunts the U.S. and his other enemies.  Like a school yard bully, he goads us to come fight him on his turf.  The turf at issue?  It is the hearts and minds of the moderate Muslim community.  That is, the battlefield of ideas and information.  On this battleground, bullets and bombs will do us as much harm as good.  Our best ammunition is credibility: being believed by those we are trying to convince.

The current administration, with its focus on bullets and bombs, has tossed away its most valuable weapon as worthless.  It has squandered our credibility as if it were nothing more than a fistful of sand.

I have no doubt that Abu Yahya understands that we are out of ammo and it’s time to fight.  He is aware that we are as far behind in this arms race as we were at the onset of WWII.   Unfortunately, we cannot this time rebuild our arsenal simply by cranking up our factory production or asking the public to invest in war bonds.  Credibility is not manufactured.   It is earned.  And slowly at that.

The kids always figure it out.

Posted in Violence on February 23, 2008 by cheappaper

And so it begins.

I’ve Snoped this and can’t find anything. Don’t know if anyone knows the real story. I read a web article some time back. I can’t find it now. Probably before I discovered Deli.its.us. As I recall, there was a rural community that had a statue in one of its public parks. The statue was of two children having a water fight – one using a hose and the other a water pistol. It had been there for years.

Apparently the water pistol looked like a real gun. A part of the community concluded that the statue sent the wrong message to the town’s children. That is, that guns and violence are acceptable. The group urged the community to remove the statue or, at a minimum, alter it to remove the water pistol. A community debate ensued.

Remarkably, some of the individuals opposing the statue resorted to violence to get their way. The statue was vandalized, apparently more than once. Finally, the artist who made the statue agreed to modify it and remove the water pistol from the child’s hand. The artist’s decision appears to have been made, in part, as a result of the vandalism to the statue.

So, if I understand it right, if we oppose violence and people disagree with us, we’ll beat them up until they agree with us that violence is wrong.

But maybe I’ve got it wrong.

I’m sure the local kids have it figured out.

Light at the end of the Tunnel